Mission of the Month for August: Wycliffe Bible Translators

Wycliffe Bible Translators was founded in 1953. Currently there are 363 people from U.K. and Ireland serving 486 million people speaking 368 languages in 71 countries.

The very first Wycliffe members from the UK worked with people groups in South America following the lead of Wycliffe US members. It wasn’t long however, before UK members started to concentrate more of their efforts on Africa and unreached people groups there.

Now, while UK members still maintain a strong focus on Africa, their member base is increasingly spread across more of the world.

Over the years, methods have shifted from British members going and translating the Bible for language communities, to working in partnership, assisting mother-tongue speakers to translate the Bible themselves.

Tools and methods have also changed over the years - while paper and pencils are still useful in very early stages for making notes on the sounds that make up a language, laptops, specialist translation software and high-speed internet that allows for real-time communication over long distances can make all the differences in today’s Bible translation.

Wycliffe is part of the Wycliffe Global Alliance, and a partner with organisations worldwide in working towards universal access to the Bible.

The full Bible is now available in close to 700 languages, and the New Testament in over 1,500 languages.  But with 1.5 billion people still without access to the full Bible in the language that speaks to them best, the vision of universal access is far from a reality, and the need for translation remains as great as ever.

Please see display table for more information and visit Wycliffe’s excellent website (www.wycliffe.org.uk).

Newsflash

· Kenya’s Deputy President promises government support for Bible translation at the launch of the Giryama Bible.

· South Asia. The translation team are getting creative to preserve the language and share God’s Word in a sensitive situation in Leoma.

· Yambetta speakers in Cameroon finally get their Easter story after hearing it in their own language for the first time.

The people of the Are Islands in Indonesia experience the power of using Scriptures in their own language